Preparation for William C. C. Chen’s 60 Movements

I just posted a short video of the “Preparation” move for Grandmaster Chen’s 60 Movements. It could actually be called “Preparation to the Preparation” since it is meant to be done before you actually start the form, and the first movement is actually called “Preparation”. It is designed to establish four indispensable things before starting your form: 1. Song Kua 2. Central Equilibrium 3. Energetic Coherence 4. Field Amplification It only takes seconds to execute this whole sequence and the effect is ginormous! It has been field-tested and is ready for primetime. And it stands on its own. Any time… Read More

Song Kua Seminar at Peaceful Wolf T’ai Chi

A week ago I had the wonderful opportunity to teach a seminar at Peaceful Wolf Tai Chi  in East Haddam, CT, hosted by my good friend, Sifu David Shaver. David is an 81 year old testimonial to the power of the internal martial arts to keep you youthful and active. He has been an actor and a rodeo bull rider, among other professions, and now focuses on teaching taijiquan and other martial arts in his beautiful studio (built by David and his students and modeled after the Zhang San Feng Hall at the T’ai Chi Farm). As I mentioned in… Read More

Tao of Buberville

Human life itself is the bearer and reality of all transcendence. Tao, ‘the way,’ is unity in change and transformation, and the perfect revelation of Tao is the man who combines the greatest change with the purest unity. Though Tao is the path, order, and unity of everything, it exists in things only potentially until it becomes living and manifest through its contact with the conscious being of the united man. Tao appears in men as the uniting force that overcomes all deviation from the ground of life, as the completing force that heals all that is sundered and broken.… Read More

Parkinson’s Disease and Taijiquan

Did you catch the NPR report about Parkinson’s Disease and taijiquan? It’s also in the New England Journal of Medicine. There was a substantial reduction in rate of falls in the taiji group (one hour, twice weekly, six months). UCLA brain scientist Dr. Michael Irwin thinks that the practice of taijiquan re-trains the areas of the brain that control movement. While this is hardly new ground for most of us in the body/mind/spirit integration network, it is always good to hear when the scientific community tests it out and confirms our experience. For many reasons, integrative activities like taijiquan don’t… Read More